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TOPIC: Do any screen calibration methods/software exist without special hardware? (For decent/good enough c

Do any screen calibration methods/software exist without special hardware? (For decent/good enough c 07 Jan 2020 18:17 #103778

  • kofman
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Hey all. My Main monitor is an LG 29UM68-P ultra wide and I use it with my MacBook Pro. I have started to do some video editing for my youtube channel but I end up using my built in MacBook display because its gorgeous and it seems to be less “colored” and translates better for content. But its small 13 inch compared to 29 inch ultra wide with all that Realestate that im missing.
I want to mess with settings and calibrate it to be more neutral and better for video editing in terms of overall settings, brightness/contrast, and RGB white balance mix.
I know there are things like the Spyder calibration system but im not at that level yet where I can drop that kind of cash for monitor calibration hardware and I don’t need Hollywood/broadcast perfection in terms of color calibration. Are there websites or software that have casual calibration tools that can guide me in what I need to change in my monitor settings?(or something in Mac or windows OS?) My monitor has on screen control software for Mac and pc which means I can just change monitor settings and color value straight from my computer with my mouse on screen instead of using the dumb on screen control with the monitor buttons like usual. I just need a reference point/method of figuring out what I need to change in settings to get the most out of this monitor before I actually invest in color calibration hardware.

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Do any screen calibration methods/software exist without special hardware? (For decent/good enough c 07 Jan 2020 20:31 #103780

  • arc
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It is nice to have products like the Intensity Shuttle to view your editing on broadcast compliant hardware. Interlaced video never looks that great on a computer screen. You will also see what the video composition looks with under-scan and over-scan enabled and disabled. You colors will also be more accurate seeing them in YUV vs RGB. That is great for broadcasting standards but there is no internet standard. Everyone's computer monitors will be very different. It is helpful to calibrate your monitor as a starting point but keep in mind the internet does not have an NTSC, ATSC or PAL standard. I have the 25" version of the LG ultra-wide. If you get it looking good on that monitor it will probably look good on my computer screen as well but it might not look correct on an iPad. Do you kind of see my point? If you get it to look decent on the LG monitor and the laptop both it will probably look decent on most computer screens. Use the two screens as a goal posts. You can also view it on your friend's computers and at the local library. They will all look different but if they all look decent you are good to go.

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Do any screen calibration methods/software exist without special hardware? (For decent/good enough c 08 Jan 2020 05:40 #103784

  • Larrie
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The Mac has a built in color calibration assistant. Go to System Preferences/Displays then click the Color button and then the Calibrate button. The Display Calibration Assistant will open. Just follow the steps. For the built in monitor all you can change is the white point. There are more controls and adjustments for your external monitor.

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Do any screen calibration methods/software exist without special hardware? (For decent/good enough c 08 Jan 2020 17:14 #103794

  • VidGreg
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Hi Kofman
You might also look into renting the calibration equipment.
Camera stores, especially those that rent lens and other photography/video equipment often also rent calibration equipment. Typically you can rent for a day or three for very little $$.
Spend some time checking the calibration on your MBP and then try to set your other monitor to match. While there you should be able to see what settings get you closest to what you want. Take a screen shot of the settings and save the profile in System Preferences>Displays>Color so you can reset if needed. You can also calibrate for the most accurate according to whatever standards you want and save those profiles.
Not always the best as you aren't able to re-calibrate later or if moving the monitors, but will give you a good start.

Hope this Helps, Greg

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Do any screen calibration methods/software exist without special hardware? (For decent/good enough c 08 Jan 2020 19:45 #103800

  • Jonathan Levin
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In order to access the "Expert" calibration mode in the Apple Display calibrator, you need to hold down the Option key when you are presented with the calibrate button.

FWIW- I've long given up on the time and expenses of calibration software/hardware. I don't have anything that is going to "broadcast" and with today's LED displays color accuracy is pretty good. We also have no control over the world of viewers and their hardware set up. I have a two display set up. One I use as full screen preview to judge edits. If I need to grade anything it is done on a calibrated (Apple) LED.

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