oliver_peters_fcpx

Oliver doesn't go for link bait headlines or 'First Look' reviews that get published 30 minutes after a product is released. He takes his time and writes probably some of the best articles on editing on the internet.

We would love to copy and paste Oliver's article straight into our website. He explores software from an experienced editor's point of view and condenses his findings down into a good read.

His review of Final Cut Pro X is no exception, although we think you'll be surprised by his closing comments. We'll let you click over to his blog for that discovery, but I'm sure he won't mind us republishing his summary:

"Final Cut Pro X is very different and it takes a while to get used to it. I’ve been beating on the evaluation software provided by Apple for about two weeks as I write this review, along with a few hours worth of press briefings from Apple staff. I’ve also conferred with probably a dozen colleagues who are also trying to shake it out, including a number of experienced feature film editors. Without a doubt, it’s definitely worth tapping into some of the various training materials if you want to use Final Cut Pro X to its fullest. The manual (available as online Help or a downloadable 395-page PDF) covers a lot, but I’ve already hit a number of undocumented features and I’m sure there are many more.

At the end of the day, this is still a developing product that isn’t ideal for every high-end situation where FCP 7 has succeeded. FCP X is a tool intended to be easier to use by people who aren’t necessarily full-time editors – meaning event videographers, video journalists, producer/directors who occasionally edit and corporate presentation professionals. These are users who may not exclusively edit for a living, but expect professional results that can’t be achieved with iMovie. Apple has focused on an architectural design for the coming decade with an eye towards people who are just starting out as video professionals and will grow with the product."