crumplepop audiodenoise fcpx

A slightly different plugin announcement. CrumplePop has just released AudioDenoise, a third party noise reducing plugin for FCPX. We asked how is it better than the built-in FCPX noise reduction and why? (It is also on special offer for a week at $49)

There are now thousands of free and commercial video plugins out there for Final Cut Pro, but not many for audio. So we were interested when CrumplePop told us about their new audio plugin AudioDenoise.

The plugin features a powerful noise reduction algorithm and sells for $99, but for one week only is on special offer at $49.

The tag line is 'designed for video editors, not sound technicians.' It is very simple, just drag and drop with only one control, a strength slider. Before we get on to why it is better than the FCPX built in Background Noise Removal tool, let's take a look at the promo video.

 

 

So why should FCPX editors use this plugin and not the built in noise reducer? We have to say that we have had variable results with the built in version, speech sounding like it is underwater when you move the slider more than about a third of the way along.

CrumplePop very kindly told us about the difference:

AudioDenoise is:

• Designed specifically for *voice*. The built in FCP X "Background Noise Removal" feature will sacrifice voice quality in order to remove noise. AudioDenoise maintains the quality of voice. We did this because we believe that video people are mostly interested in denoising vocal tracks (interviews, dialogue, podcasts, voiceover).

• Allows you to select a specific noise region for better results (by placing the playhead on a noise region before you drag on the plugin).

• Allows you to perform multiple passes by dropping on multiple instances of the plugin. This will yield better results in instances of heavy noise.

 

This is the first audio plugin distributed through the FxFactory plugin management system. This means you can try the plugin out yourself for free, but you'll get a rather loud spike of tone every few seconds. Should you have the unfortunate requirement to edit in Adobe's Premiere Pro, the same license will work there too although the installation is slightly more complicated.

Our initial tests are positive, but it is hard to do comparisons between the new plugin and the built in audio analysis as that tone takes a toll on our ears after a few seconds. Maybe putting in silence instead would have been better.

We would also have liked to see a manual or automatic gain control included as the plugin will lower the overall volume once the background noise has been removed.

There is also a tutorial on AudioDenoise from FxFactory.