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TOPIC: Outdoor filming vs indoor

Outdoor filming vs indoor 23 Mar 2017 13:49 #86680

  • Wright
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I am going to shoot in controlled indoor lighting soon, an interview, it seems to be a good idea to just set the camera to 25fps (EU) and leave the shutter at 1/50 an then let the iso be what it needs to be to get normal exposure.
I assume that will be a no brainer to edit.

But I noticed if I want to do some outdoor videoe, by just doing some test shots pointing my camera outside to record people on the street at daylight my camera in manual mode was saying I overexposed all the way up to around 1/2000 shutterspeed (auto iso) if I also want to have shallow depth of field like F2.8 or so.
Yikes.. that wont look good on the edited video right? I mean if I want people´s motion to appear comfortable to the eyes I should try to stay close to 1/50 shutterspeed right?
I guess the only option here is to use ND filter unless there are some magic tweaks I can do compensate in FCP?
I could potentially record in 50fps and use around 1/100 shutterspeed but that does not seem to make a big difference to exposure outdoor.
Last Edit: 23 Mar 2017 13:51 by Wright.
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Outdoor filming vs indoor 23 Mar 2017 14:41 #86682

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If you want to stay at full aperture and a moderate shutter speed, you must use ND. Depending on your prime's objective, a collection of NDs will cost you several hundred dollars. To bring 1/2000th down to 1/50th is, umm, just a minute, don't tell me, umm, roughly 5 to 6 stops. ND64. But you want to be able to go one stop either way, maybe two, because clouds may come in or your venue changes to a beach or white parking lot. That's three or five filters.
www.alexwisephotography.net/blog/2009/07...ity-reference-chart/
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neutral-density_filter
tiffen.com/neutral-density/
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Outdoor filming vs indoor 23 Mar 2017 15:21 #86685

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Thanks, yeah, I kind of had a feeling that ND was the proper option :)
I had a 8x filter laying around, that made it a bit darker but it was not until I put on an additional polarizing filter that I came down to exactly 1/50 with proper exposure. But yeah polarizer is not the correct way to get to where I want so I´ll go get some variable filter to have some room to adjust up/down.

Thanks!
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Outdoor filming vs indoor 23 Mar 2017 20:21 #86690

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Wright wrote:
...outdoor videoe...camera in manual mode...overexposed...to around 1/2000...if I also want to have shallow depth of field like F2.8 or so...if I want people´s motion to appear comfortable to the eyes I should try to stay close to 1/50 shutterspeed right?....I guess the only option here is to use ND filter unless there are some magic tweaks I can do compensate in FCP?...

Welcome to the world of wide aperture video outdoors. While this has always existed, in the pre-DSLR era cameras often had small sensors and built-in ND filters. However it is difficult and expensive to put a large diameter, optically excellent variable ND filter inside a compact large-sensor camera.

For DSLR and similar-sensor cameras there are some 3rd-party "ND throttle" adapters but these have their own issues. I would not recommend one of these without extensive research and testing: www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1041731-R...throttle_adpter.html

Another problem is external variable ND filters often preclude using a lens hood. So you're outdoors in bright conditions (often sunny) -- the very conditions when you *need* a lens hood, yet the ND filter prevents this. For scripted shooting a matte box with drop in filters can work but for documentary and news shooting you really need a variable ND, which in turn means some hokey lens hood solution or doing without a lens hood.

The bottom line is by hook or crook you must use an ND filter of some type -- no matter what the operational impact. You cannot generally risk shooting at a high (or varying) shutter speed due to motion artifacts. You could stop down to f/22 but you may as well use a consumer camcorder then.

The Sony FS5 has a nice internal electronic variable ND but it's one of the very few. For all the DSLR and mirrorless shooters it's picking whatever variable ND and lens hood combination (if any) they can get to work. Also I would not suggest putting a $50 filter on a $2,000 lens.
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Outdoor filming vs indoor 23 Mar 2017 22:38 #86693

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You're welcome. Good luck with your project!
BTW: A variable ND is a polarizer.
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Outdoor filming vs indoor 24 Mar 2017 09:44 #86700

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I've never gotten lens flare when using a polarizer or an ND filter.
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Outdoor filming vs indoor 24 Mar 2017 11:59 #86707

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Thanks for the inputs!
If I wanna do some short shots with a bit slomo I should be able to (or perhaps I have to) go with 100fps and use 1/200 shutter, slow it down in post and get the same natural non-stutter movement as if I was using 1/50 + 25fps (but yes of course also slower movement) right?
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Outdoor filming vs indoor 24 Mar 2017 15:37 #86713

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I remember in the olden days when flare was problem. Or it was a distinct creative decision that took deep understanding of how your lens performed and how to use point source listing or the sun. Now, of course, you put flare in as a post production effect. Boring.
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Outdoor filming vs indoor 24 Mar 2017 15:39 #86714

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If you wish to do slow motion, study the technique carefully, make some tests, and know what you're doing BEFORE you commit during shooting. Your selection of shutter speed will affect your slow motion effect. You just want to know what that looks like for certain movements before you soot it.
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